Wow! A consensus with the Storm Early Next Week….Could be a Big daddy!

The pattern really has gone to the extreme with the storm early next week. The models seem to have come into consensus with the storm. It seems the models want to phase the trough with the southern branch energy to produce a storm that tracks just east of the Appalachians. You know darn well the storm is going to head to the coast and try to seek out the warm waters if that is correct. So while the models show the heavy snow of over a foot across western PA, eastern OH into Ontario, it could easily be east of there depending on the track. So it appears we have the storm, now the track and snow amounts is next. By the way, the NAO is shown to go negative which one would think the storm would to the coast.

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4 Comments on “Wow! A consensus with the Storm Early Next Week….Could be a Big daddy!

  1. Wow Henry! Last winter was such a bust and this fall has been so warm that I had kind of put snow out of my conscience for this winter. Hold onto your “Big Daddy” hat though because you know how many times the models will flip on this one. Still, this is the most promising model run for the east that I’ve seen in a good while. Bring it on home Henry!!

  2. I don’t believe any of this changes all the time

  3. Yes they are big storms but it’s all rain pretty much for the Northeast not exciting at all!!

  4. If the NAO does in fact take a deep dive into negative territory, I don’t see how we don’t get a coastal with snow all through the Northeast and New England. I guess it all depends on where precisely the actual block is positioned something I don’t think any model really has a clue until it actually occurs. So, a coastal track is just as likely as an inland track by the time we get to next week. You also have to worry about sneaky CAD east of the mountains in New England if the primary storm tracks very far west. I live in a prime CAD region and have already seen it with the last few storms with mixed precipitation and freezing rain on the frontend of the storms and the warm air never mixing down to the surface. I was in the 30s while 35 miles ESE of me, August, Maine was in the low 50s.

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